Health


Health Access through In-Kind Donations

PADF's In-Kind Donations Program plays an important role in providing better health access in the Latin America and Caribbean region to improve health services for local residents and reduce service costs. With the support of a network of partners, such as U.S. medical facilities, public agencies, manufacturers, and universities, PADF distributes high-quality new and used equipment and supplies to health care institutions that serve vulnerable populations. Donated materials include: hospital beds, dental equipment, computerized tomography (CT) scanners, neonatal intensive care units, anesthesia units, and other equipment. For many organizations, a donation of medical equipment can mean the difference between upgrading aging equipment and having to increase health care costs in order to afford new equipment.

Public Health  

PADF has collaborated with public and private sector partners to develop an online platform that can serve as a foundation to inform national and regional strategies and policies to reduce maternal mortality throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. This multi-country initiative aims to provide better access to maternal health information in order to improve maternal health data collection, and highlight best practices to tackle maternal mortality in the region. This technology, or electronic handbook, aims to include a comprehensive review of existing data sources at the country and regional/local level with supplemental sources collected through key-informant interviews with local stakeholders.

PADF also collaborates with the private sector and local organizations to scale-up chronic disease care services for at-risk communities ranging from health promotion, disease prevention, and treatment services. In addition, PADF helps build local capacities for access to health for vulnerable populations, as well as to promote health education to improve the quality of life for patients, relatives, health professionals and the community affected by chronic diseases.

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