USAID Program Brings Water, Jobs to Northeast Haiti

As the only female machine operator at CASTMI water purification plant in the Haitian border town of Ouanaminthe, Makilise Joseph takes pride in her work. A good job is hard to find in Haiti, she says. A native of Ounamanthe, Makilise moved to Port-au-Prince in order to find work. She was working as a product inspector at a t-shirt factory when the 2010 earthquake happened. Her home collapsed, crushing and killing two young cousins inside. Now she lives back in her hometown and she is able to support her little boy and elderly father with the income she makes at the plant. 

Run by a member of the Haitian Diaspora, CASTMI provides purified water to the public in bulk and individual sachets. CASTMI received a grant and technical assistance from the USAID-funded LEAD program to upgrade their facility with new equipment and move to a larger space. This allowed them to add bottled water to their product line.

Pastor Jean-Louis Vicelot is a regular CASTMI customer.

Our water is the best," Makilise says with a smile. "I see how they treat the water with my own eyes and I’m confident in the process. I trust it.” 

The local community relies on CASTMI for purified water. 

"Life depends on water," says Jean-Louis Vicelot, a pastor at the Baptist church in nearby Huhaut. He visits CASTMI two or three times each week to purchase five gallons of purified water. If there wasn’t a space like this, he’d be treating the water himself, he says. In the past, he had to travel to Cap-Haitian. Now, its nearby.

“I feel so happy the region is developing," he says. "More people will be employed.” 

CASTMI employees pose in front of the delivery van.

Run by a member of the Haitian Diaspora, CASTMI provides purified water to the public in bulk and individual sachets. 

Run by a member of the Haitian Diaspora, CASTMI provides purified water to the public in bulk and individual sachets. 

Belize Communities Receive Tools, Training for Disasters

PADF Belize Project Director Minerva Pinelo and a representative of Belize National Emergency Management Organization pose for a picture with the donated equipment.

The Pan American Development handed over tools and equipment to the Belize National Emergency Management Organization (NEMO) and to local first responders in the towns of for Dangriga and Hopkins Village in southern Belize. 

First responders received certificates after completing seven weeks of training in search and rescue, first aid and shelter management.

Funded by Taiwan, the Community Preparedness and Resilience initiative has assisted more than 14,000 residents in preparing for and responding to disasters. The year-long project trained and certified Community Disaster Response Teams, engaged local students about climate change, created hazard maps and early warning systems in each community and planted mangrove trees to mitigate coastal erosion.  

Each community response team is now equipped with a first aid kit and search and rescue bags. NEMO received equipment including a chainsaw, flotation device, burn kit, wheelbarrow and safety vests helmets and glasses. 

Shorlette Grant, Lynn Rodriguez and Oris Lewis were used their training as first responders during and after Hurricane Earl struck Belize in August.

Building Trust Between Youth and Law Enforcement

Last month, Bahamian students received a tour of the Royal Bahamas Police Force Headquarters in Nassau. The event was sponsored by the Resistance and Prevention (RAPP) program, which uses a community-centered approach to help police and other officials prevent youth crime. 

Funded by the U.S. State Department Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) and implemented by PADF, RAPP includes community programs that allow young people to learn more about the justice system and vice versa. The goal is to build mutual trust between the police, the government and Bahamian youth.

At-risk youth from the Fort Charlotte Urban Renewal Summer Camp participated in the the job shadowing event led by Officer Humphrey Bain. They learned about the Canine, Mobile Fire and Drug Enforcement units and came away with a clearer picture of what police do every day.

Youth violence stems from complex issues, including trouble at home and lack of access to social services, so the prevention involves a tiered approach. “It’s important to address these issues collectively and from an inter-agency perspective,” says Caterina Valero, PADF Senior Programs Director. “It’s also important to change young people’s perception of the police. Many youth think of the police as the enemy, rather than an ally.”

Empowering Haitian Rice Farmers

Maryse Jumelle and her husband Charles are passionate entrepreneurs who have revived a rice mill in the Artibonite region in Haiti. Charles’ family had been in the rice production business for generations. It was his wife, Maryse, who convinced him to restart operations.

Known as the rice basin of Haiti, Artibonite is a rich, fertile region fed by seasonal rains and the Artibonite river. When Maryse first moved there with her husband, she didn’t know anyone in the area besides her in-laws. It is a traditional community and local farmers are afraid of modernization, she says. “But, when I arrived in the plains of Artibonite, in Pont Sonde, I found a small house—a cottage—and I said to Charles: ‘I love this place, I would really like to settle here and work in rice production.’” The couple stayed and launched Moulin Nan Noté, an enterprise that produces rice and purchases it from local farmers. They operate a rice mill and sell Haitian rice domestically. After 10 years in business, they are now looking to export as well.

Rice cultivation is typically dominated by women in Artibonite and Maryse has also been instrumental in organizing a women’s association of rice producers and laborers in Saint-Marc. The association is called Fanm Plantez Renal-Preval and has over 400 members. Moulin Nan Noté’s location is extremely convenient for local farmers.  It offers local producers an alternative to walking many kilometers to find a mill. Moulin Nan Noté has also built shelters to protect their rice farmers from the blazing sun while they parboil their crop.

Moulin Nan Noté buys rice from local farmers, while also allowing them to use the mill for a small fee, if they wish to sell their rice directly. With funds from the Leveraging Effective Application of Direct Investments (LEAD) program, Moulin Lanoté was able to purchase equipment to modernize its operations, including cultivation, storage and packaging for sale in supermarket.  

LEAD was launched in 2011 by USAID to provide support for small- and medium-sized enterprises in Haiti. The program is implemented by the Pan American Development Foundation, which provides technical assistance. To date, the program has supported 31 Haitian enterprises.

“It is because of the LEAD grant that I could buy modern appliances such as a bagging machine, sealers, and scales,” says Maryse.  “I would not have been able to market at this level without using LEAD, if I did not participate in the business plan competitions and win!”

The company also used its own capital to match the LEAD grant and was able to purchase important equipment such as tillers and a silo.  LEAD has facilitated consultations with international and local agronomists who will help Maryse and Charles to triple their production.

Moulin Nan Noté sells many varieties of Haitian rice—white, parboiled, high-fiber—which they process and bag in their location in Port-au-Prince. Their product is available under the brand name Délice in 2.5, 5, 10, 25 and even 100-pound bags at supermarkets and wholesalers in Port-au-Prince. Recently, their rice was sent to a lab in Canada for testing and they are now able to add a nutrition label to their bags.

Maryse and Charles credit the LEAD program for helping them run a more professional business. "The training on accounting and finance that LEAD offered us has allowed us to formalize our business,” says Maryse. “Now we have an operating manual that covers all our procedures; we use financial software; we generate timely reports that help us make good decisions. Now Moulin Nan Noté is a modern business.”

The business makes a big impact on local farmers. Before this enterprise restarted the mill, rice producer Lillianne Alexis walked very far, carrying her rice on donkeys or by motorcycle to mill it and resell it. Her rice lost value when it was broken instead of milled. Now, she says, “the machines at Nan Noté are excellent!” The proximity of the mill is also a plus for farmers as they don’t have to spend their money on transportation.

Maryse and Charles are not done dreaming. After modernizing their operations, they hope to join the export market. Parboiled rice, which is beloved in Haiti, is characterized by a strong odor. Further, its processing is often done using firewood, which is a strain on local forests. Moulin Nan Noté will benefit from another USAID program called LEVE, which will help the company purchase an electric steamer and dryer. This will help farmers standardize the color and quality of the rice and reduce the odor. Moulin Nan Noté will export this rice throughout the Caribbean as well as to North America.

And after that? Maryse and Charles are passionate entrepreneurs who have set their sights on expanding into rice flour production and brown rice. LEAD is proud of the achievements of these two future leaders in the Haitian rice industry and looks forward to their continued success.

About LEAD
USAID’s Leveraging Effective Application of Direct Investments (LEAD) project aims to attract investments in Haitian SMEs and increase the development impact of remittances. LEAD operates in the three development corridors: Cap-Haïtien, Saint-Marc, and Port-au-Prince. The project is implemented by the Pan American Development Foundation (PADF). 

GFC Nieuws | Meer dan 700 Jongeren Geholpen aan een Baan Door Kari Yu

GFC Nieuws

De Pan American Development Foundation (PADF) heeft deze week de 8e certificaat-uitreiking en banenbeurs voor jongeren die met succes de Kari Yu! Youth to Youth (Y2Y) training hebben afgerond.

Bij die speciale uitreiking gedenkt Kari Yu! ook het feit dat meer dan 700 jonge Surinamers een baan hebben gevonden in het bedrijfsleven.

Om de bereikte resultaten te vieren, zal Kari Yu! een boek presenteren: “Faces of Kari Yu!” met de persoonlijke verhalen van 20 jongeren die een positieve verandering hebben doorgemaakt in hun leven dankzij de training en begeleiding. (GFC)

PADF Trainees Assist Belize Government after Hurricane Earl

Shorlette Grant, Lynn Rodriguez and Oris Lewis assisted as the First Aid team in Hopkins, Belize.

Hurricane Earl made landfall in Belize City on August 4, 2016, causing millions of dollars in damage to infrastructure, as well as the tourism and agriculture sectors. The Southern coastal communities of Hopkins and Dangriga were better prepared to face the storm thanks to the Community Preparedness and Resilience Project, funded by Taiwan and implemented by the Pan American Development Foundation (PADF). The project assisted over 14,000 residents of Belize’s Stann Creek District in preparing for and responding to disasters. Newly-trained and equipped Community Disaster Response Teams were on hand to assist their neighbors during and after the hurricane. The project also created hazard maps, flood gauges and strengthened early warning systems in each community.

Francis Zuniga (right), a newly-elected member of the Hopkins Village Council, assisted as Shelter Manager.

PADF project participants who received disaster preparedness and risk education training through the project have been supporting the Belize National Emergency Management Organization (NEMO) following Hurricane Earl.

The Government Belize continues to assess the damage, but NEMO has declared that priority areas include:

  1. Search and rescue

  2. Medical care

  3. Shelter 

  4. Clearing of debris along the highways

  5. Restoration of utilities

  6. Inspection of airports and seaports

In addition, ongoing evaluations will determine the level of required support for affected vulnerable communities isolated by the mountainous terrain and flooded rivers.

David Cruz (left) joined NEMO as part of the Search and Rescue Committee

PADF and Taiwan have been collaborating with countries throughout the region to address emergencies and natural disasters. The Taiwan-PADF Disaster Assistance and Reconstruction Fund is a five-year partnership to foster preparedness and mitigation programs. Community-based disaster preparedness projects have been carried out in Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Honduras and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The Disaster Assistance and Reconstruction Fund has delivered assistance to more than 282,000 people in Latin America & the Caribbean since 2012.

BahamasLocal.com | PADF Sponsored Workshop Equips Community Facilitators

Last week, the Pan American Development Foundation (PADF), through its Resistance And Prevention Program (RAPP), organized a five-day workshop to train local facilitators on effective crime prevention strategies.

A total of 21 key stakeholders from the Bahamas Department of Correctional Services, Department Social Services, Urban Renewal, Ministry of Education, the Bahamas Bar Association, law enforcement agencies and community activists participated in the sessions held at the Bahamas Red Cross headquarters.

PADF Program Coordinator, Mrs. Charo Walker-Morley said the certification workshop provided facilitators with practical prevention tools for crime reduction. “We targeted law enforcement and justice sector officials as well as community leaders who are actively involved in crime prevention to participate,” she said. “As a result of the training, persons are able to go into areas as facilitators for the RAPP program and work as catalysts within the community.”

PADF brought in detectives Mary Wheat and Jason Jones of the Portland Police Bureau in Portland, Oregon to conduct the training. The team identified proven prevention and intervention techniques used to resolve community conflicts throughout the United States and in other territories in the region. Training modules for each session were structured around group activities, discussions and presentations on topics such as “Root Causes of Youth Crime and Violence”, “Gangs and Organized Crime” and “Understanding Domestic Violence and Teen Dating Abuse.” 

Workshop participant Donna Mae Humes, Chief Correctional Officer, Bahamas Department of Corrections, said her best experience was standing in front of the class on the final day and giving a presentation on “Communication and Effective Listening”. “The training will allow me to carry out outreach with female inmates in an effort to turn them away from a life of crime.”

The training comes after a series of initiatives put on by RAPP since the launch of its second phase back in April. Organizers work closely with the Royal Bahamas Police Force to impact urban communities through job shadowing, youth dialogues and mock court trials. Over 100 young Bahamians have completed job shadowing activities at RBPF headquarters, Department of Correctional Services and Bahamas Customs.

“Job shadowing allows young people to see how professionals administer law in the country. It works to build trust between the participants and law enforcement agents. By seeing the day-to-day operations in various agencies, they can interact in a positive way with persons in positions of authority and are exposed to real career options for the future,” Walker-Morley explained.

Last month, the program also collaborated with the Royal Bahamas Police Force summer camp and the Elijhay’s Hilltop Cottage Ministries Camp Extraordinaire 2016. Plans are in progress for the newly certified facilitators to set up community dialogues at venues within neighborhoods where persons can talk about the impact of crime and leaders can apply new techniques from the training.

RAPP falls under the Washington, DC-based PADF and is fully funded by the United States Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs. In addition to work in New Providence, organizers will extend the program throughout The Bahamas including Grand Bahama, Abaco, Exuma, Eleuthera and Mayaguana. Currently, RAPP (Resistance And Prevention Program) is active in The Bahamas, Trinidad and Suriname.

Nassau Guardian | Workshop Equips Community Facilitators With Crime Prevention Tips

Last week, the Pan American Development Foundation (PADF), through its Resistance And Prevention Program (RAPP), organized a five-day workshop to train local facilitators on effective crime prevention strategies.

A total of 21 key stakeholders from the Bahamas Department of Correctional Services, Department of Social Services, Urban Renewal, Ministry of Education, the Bahamas Bar Association, law enforcement agencies and community activists participated in the sessions held at the Bahamas Red Cross headquarters.

PADF Program Coordinator Charo Walker-Morley said the certification workshop provided facilitators with practical prevention tools for crime reduction. “We targeted law enforcement and justice sector officials as well as community leaders who are actively involved in crime prevention to participate,” she said.

“As a result of the training, persons are able to go into areas as facilitators for the RAPP program and work as catalysts within the community.”

PADF brought in detectives Mary Wheat and Jason Jones of the Portland Police Bureau in Portland, Oregon to conduct the training. The team identified proven prevention and intervention techniques used to resolve community conflicts throughout the United States and in other territories in the region. Training modules for each session were structured around group activities, discussions and presentations on topics such as “Root Causes of Youth Crime and Violence”, “Gangs and Organized Crime” and “Understanding Domestic Violence and Teen Dating Abuse”.

Workshop participant Donna Mae Humes, chief correctional officer, Bahamas Department of Corrections, said her best experience was standing in front of the class on the final day and giving a presentation on “Communication and Effective Listening”.

“The training will allow me to carry out outreach with female inmates in an effort to turn them away from a life of crime,” she said.

The training comes after a series of initiatives put on by RAPP since the launch of its second phase back in April. Organizers work closely with the Royal Bahamas Police Force to impact urban communities through job shadowing, youth dialogues and mock court trials. Over 100 young Bahamians have completed job shadowing activities at RBPF headquarters, the Department of Correctional Services and Bahamas Customs.

“Job shadowing allows young people to see how professionals administer law in the country. It works to build trust between the participants and law enforcement agents. By seeing the day-to-day operations in various agencies, they can interact in a positive way with persons in positions of authority and are exposed to real career options for the future,” Walker-Morley explained.

Last month, the program also collaborated with the Royal Bahamas Police Force summer camp and the Elijhay’s Hilltop Cottage Ministries Camp Extraordinaire 2016. Plans are in progress for the newly certified facilitators to set up community dialogues at venues within neighborhoods, where persons can talk about the impact of crime and leaders can apply new techniques from the training.

RAPP falls under the Washington, D.C.-based PADF and is fully funded by the United States Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs. In addition to work in New Providence, organizers will extend the program throughout The Bahamas including Grand Bahama, Abaco, Exuma, Eleuthera and Mayaguana. Currently, RAPP (Resistance And Prevention Program) is active in The Bahamas, Trinidad and Suriname. 

Royal Caribbean and PADF Restore Bahamas Clinic Damaged by Hurricane

Crooked Island Receives New Medical Equipment

Nassau, Bahamas (July 21, 2016) — The Pan American Development Foundation (PADF) received a donation from Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. to support the rehabilitation of a community clinic in Crooked Island, Bahamas, that sustained severe damage in October 2015 due to Hurricane Joaquin.

"We are pleased to partner with Royal Caribbean to deliver vital medical supplies to one of the most secluded islands in the Bahamas,” says Liza Mantilla, PADF's director of disaster management. “This clinic is a lifeline to the community. Thanks to this new equipment, it will be able to operate and continue providing care for local residents.”

With funding from Royal Caribbean, PADF procured the most urgently-needed medical equipment to facilitate the reopening of the clinic, which serves the remote island’s 330 residents. The clinic will now have a new examination table, vital signs monitor, defibrillator, centrifuge, electrocardiogram machine and a wheelchair, to help resume its day-to-day operations. In January 2016, Royal Caribbean and PADF donated 15 portable household generators to hurricane-affected families in Crooked Island.

"On behalf of The Bahamas government, the Ministry of Health and NEMA we are truly pleased with the partnership that has developed within the past year between PADF and NEMA in assisting with our Joaquin relief and assistance program," said Captain Steven Russell, Director of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA). "Both the donation of the generators which were delivered to needy persons on affected islands and now the assortment of medical equipment for the clinics in Crooked Island is indeed greatly appreciated and will continue to go a long way in bringing relief, restoration and support to the island of Crooked Island."

The donation was made possible through coordination with the Bahamas National Emergency Management Agency, the Ministry of Health and the Embassy of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in Washington, D.C.

Since 2007, Royal Caribbean has donated more than $2 million to PADF to fund disaster management, community strengthening and sustainable livelihoods in the region. Oversight for Royal Caribbean’s corporate social responsibility program has been provided by PADF in 25 countries, focusing on timely response to and recovery from natural disasters and enhancing the prosperity and resilience of communities.

Hurricane Joaquin, a Category 4 storm, hit The Bahamas in October 2015.  Storm surges and heavy rainfall caused extensive flooding in the southern Long, Acklins, and Crooked Island, severely damaging housing, roads, medical clinics, communications systems, coastal ecosystems, and water and sanitation infrastructure. Initial estimates place the damage incurred by Hurricane Joaquin to be well over USD $60 million. 

About Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.
Royal Caribbean International is an award-winning global cruise brand with a 46-year legacy of innovation and introducing industry “firsts” never before seen at sea. The cruise line sails 24 of the world’s most innovative cruise ships to the most popular destinations in Bermuda and the Caribbean, Europe, Canada and New England, Alaska, South America, Asia, and Australia and New Zealand.

About PADF
PADF operates throughout Latin America and the Caribbean to generate economic opportunities, advance social progress, strengthen civil society, and prepare for and respond to natural disasters and humanitarian crises. In 2015, the Foundation reached more than 17 million people in 22 countries.

Maite Perroni se une a PADF Para Erradicar el Trabajo Infantil en Las Americas y el Caribe

Read in English

Se preparan para lanzar una campaña global dirigida a concientizar a la juventud y familias sobre el trabajo infantil

Washington, DC (20 de julio de 2016) — La Fundación Panamericana para el Desarrollo (PADF, por sus siglas en inglés), el brazo humanitario de la Organización de los Estados Americanos (OEA), une fuerzas con la actriz y cantante mexicana Maite Perroni para luchar contra el trabajo infantil a nivel global.   Cerca de 168 millones de niños y jóvenes entre los 5-17 años de edad se ven afectados por la explotación laboral, y la mayoría de ellos no terminan la escuela secundaria.

El trabajo infantil no resuelve los problemas de pobreza, ni las carencias familiares.  Sólo vulnera los derechos de las nuestros niños a la educación, la salud, al juego y al sano desarrollo. A través de esta iniciativa, PADF busca unir los esfuerzos de los gobiernos, el sector privado y sociedad civil, para crear conciencia en las comunidades, particularmente entre los jóvenes, para que se integren y se conviertan en agentes de cambio.

“La educación es un derecho fundamental que permite el desarrollo no solo de todos nosotros como individuos, sino también de nuestra sociedad en general. Mi sueño es que todos los niños latinoamericanos permanezcan en la escuela para recibir educación, y así puedan contribuira un mejor futuro para ellos, sus familias y para la sociedad.  Niños y jóvenes educados resultan en una sociedad más capacitada para el progreso económico y social del país”, señaló Maite Perroni. “Los niños y jóvenes merecen la oportunidad de tener un futuro saludable y esperanzador,” dijo Perroni. 

El objetivo de la campaña, que primero partirá en América Latina y el Caribe donde más de 5,7 millones de niños aún están bajo condiciones de trabajo infantil, es concientizar a todos aquellos que forman parte del entorno social de los niños y adolecentes para que estos tengan acceso integral y completo a la educación con el propósito de aumentar sus oportunidades a futuro, reducir la pobreza, y mejorar las condiciones de bienestar para todas las comunidades. La campaña será lanzada a principios de octubre, durante una conferencia de prensa ya través del sitio web y plataformas sociales de Maite Perroni.  Adicionalmente, los spots de TV serán transmitidos por canales de televisión, redes sociales y estaciones radiales en Español, Ingles, Portugués y Francés.

“Esta es una oportunidad para solicitar el apoyo de todos, y en particular el de los jóvenes ya que ellos tienen una voz poderosa y viral que puede ayudar a tener un gran impacto. Esperamos que a través de esta nueva iniciativa en alianza con Maite Perroni podamos seguir educando e influyendo en el cambio de percepción en los países,” señaló Hearly Mayr, Director de Comunicaciones de PADF.  “Desde antes de los inicios de su carrera artística Maite ha sido reconocida como ejemplo deexcelencia y logros.  Ella ha superado muchos obstáculos para alcanzar un gran éxito, y siempre sirviendo como figura y fuente de inspiración, lo cual la convierte en la embajadora ideal para esta campaña”, dijo Mayr.

PADF tiene una larga trayectoria de cooperación en el tema del Trabajo Infantil. En 2013 trabajó con el gobierno mexicano, socios del sector privado y de la sociedad civil, para lanzar la campaña “México Sin Trabajo Infantil”, la cual contribuyó a que el número de niños en situación de trabajo infantil en México se redujera por más de 500,000 y ganó el premio “Global Awareness Award”, en el Festival Mundial de Medios (World Media Festival) en Alemania.

Socios corporativos y otras figuras publicas interesados en unirse a esta campaña y para más información, comuníquese con María-Esmeralda Paguaga, Gerente General de la Oficina de Innovación & Estrategia, PADF,  mepaguaga@padf.org

Contacto de prensa:
Emily Haile, Oficina de Comunicaciones, PADF

+1(202) 458-6410 |  ehaile@padf.org