A HEMISPHERE OF OPPORTUNITY.
FOR ALL.

2020 Annual Report

A HEMISPHERE OF OPPORTUNITY. FOR ALL.

In 2020, the Pan American Development Foundation (PADF) reached over 1.3 million people, 54 percent of whom were women.

We provided targeted assistance to the most vulnerable populations in Latin America and the Caribbean during the COVID-19 pandemic. We invite you to learn more about our work to support human development and improve human security.

Background image

Letter from the Board President and Executive Director

Dear Friends,

2020 was a year like no other. Latin America and the Caribbean were hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, exacerbating inequities and triggering an economic recession. We at the Pan American Development Foundation (PADF) stood by the most vulnerable in the region in their time of greatest need, providing an immediate response. We adapted our programs and identified innovative ways to continue to deliver services and support communities across the hemisphere and promote resilient livelihoods. We invite you to read our 2020 Annual Report and learn about the lives we impacted and the stories of hope and promise for a better future. Soon after the start of the pandemic, we realized that hunger was an immediate consequence of lockdowns and massive unemployment. Through strategic partnerships with the public and private sectors, we mobilized support to deliver food baskets to the most vulnerable populations in Colombia, Ecuador, and Mexico, such as migrants, displaced persons, domestic workers, and populations in insecure and remote areas. These food baskets contained the basic staples to feed a family of four for a month and provided a lifeline when these families needed it most. To mitigate the health and economic impacts of the pandemic, PADF raised funds for the purchase of groceries and medicines to support children with severe disabilities in the community of Juchitán, Mexico. These vulnerable children relied on services from a local community center built with PADF’s assistance and closed temporarily during the pandemic. We also moved quickly to produce and disseminate educational materials focused on prevention, hygiene, fighting disinformation, and encouraging citizens to stay home. These health awareness materials were translated into English, Spanish, and Creole and adapted to each culture and context. In Haiti, for instance, we partnered with popular performing artist BIC to release a new song, sharing public health guidelines and demonstrating how to wash hands properly. PADF helped over 1.3 million people in 2020, people like Alba Luz Germán, a young and determined survivor of domestic violence from El Salvador. She is the owner of Alba’s Bakery, a start-up that received support through our labor rights program and is now growing and on the path to the formal economy.

”IT HASN’T BEEN EASY. I SUFFERED SO MUCH VIOLENCE,” SAID ALBA. “BUT NOW, I’M FINANCIALLY INDEPENDENT AND I CAN SHARE THIS ACHIEVEMENT WITH MY EMPLOYEES. THERE IS NO LIMIT TO WHAT I CAN DO.”

We agree with Alba and believe that there is no limit to what our region can accomplish. Throughout the year, we pivoted our programs to continue to provide targeted support despite the ongoing pandemic. In Guatemala, where PADF aims to prevent and respond to trafficking in persons by educating and empowering local women in the Western Highlands, we moved all training online and worked with participants virtually – a bold and innovative move for a project focused on areas where internet penetration is low. We implemented not one, but three successful online trainings for a total of almost 400 people. In Haiti, we offered environmental education to students, teachers, and their surrounding communities. We trained students on the consequences of deforestation, the importance and benefits of trees, and techniques for tree planting and maintenance. Equipped with this new knowledge, these youth will help build a better, greener future. In Belize, we are advising the criminal justice sector on reforms to the legislative framework aimed at supporting and protecting victims and witnesses. This important work seeks to increase assistance to persons eligible for witness protection and who may be unwilling to testify and cooperate during criminal proceedings. Our team remains committed to promoting economic recovery in the months and years ahead and creating a hemisphere of opportunity, for all. We have continued to diversify our donor base, with more support from multilaterals, diverse governments, and private sector companies. We are grateful to our donors and invite others to join us in our mission to support the most vulnerable in the region during this critical time. With gratitude, Kathy Barclay Board President Katie Taylor Executive Director
Background image

Our Response to COVID-19

Our Response to COVID-19


Health, Nutrition, and Economic Opportunities

1.1 million

People receiving WASH and infection prevention supplies, messages, psychosocial support or primary healthcare

104,433

Households/people benefitting from direct cash/in-kind financial aid and/or food assistance

23,310

Vulnerable populations who are food secure

126

Marginalized communities receiving and using health services or public information channels

15

Health and nutrition community-led and managed development initiatives


Peace, Justice, and Security

9

Activities addressing transparency, anti-corruption, citizen engagement, and service delivery for vulnerable groups

65

Cases receiving decentralized legal support in partnership with civil society organizations

247

Communities with institutions in place that increase confidence related to rule of law or other police and citizen security actions

34

Community security plans for COVID-19 implemented between law enforcement, civil society organizations, and communities
Background image

Latin America and the Caribbean were disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

From the highest rates of infection, a devastating economic recession that has exacerbated inequalities, a digital divide that has left the most vulnerable students behind, an increase in gender-based violence during lockdowns, the deterioration of basic rights as support and monitoring systems were scaled back, and back-to-back devastating hurricanes, the region faced unthinkable pain and setbacks in 2020. Since the beginning of the pandemic and throughout 2020, PADF has adapted its program delivery and continued to support the most vulnerable communities with innovative approaches.
Latin America and the Caribbean were disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Economic Opportunities

Promoting employability, entrepreneurship, and community development

Learn more
Economic Opportunities

BUILDING TRUST AND ENGAGING COMMUNITIES IN HAITI

In Haiti, local governments often face difficulty delivering basic public services, such as education and access to clean drinking water. Overdependence on the central government erodes citizens’ trust, hindering community involvement in local governance. PADF worked with diverse partners from the public and private sectors in 10 communities to identify, prioritize, and plan to address communal needs. By building consensus and local networks, this inclusive process creates trust and strengthens community ownership of the Communal Development Plans (PCD in French). Throughout the process, sociopolitical unrest, insecurity, and the 2019 peyi-lok or country shutdown disrupted progress. These challenges were followed by COVID-19, with rumors about the virus resulting in healthcare facilities, medical workers, and patients being attacked. In response to the pandemic, program staff worked with four urban communities heavily impacted by the virus to create 3,375 jobs. Community members were employed as street cleaners, decreasing the risk of waterborne disease, while others raised awareness about COVID-19 and how to prevent its spread. These jobs helped many negatively impacted by the economic downturn and made additional positive differences in participants’ lives.

“BEFORE COMMITTING [TO THE JOB], I WAS VERY RESERVED AND SHY,” SAID STEPHANIA SAUREL, HIRED AS THE LEADER OF A 50-PERSON AWARENESS-RAISING TEAM. “NOW IT IS WITH EASE AND ASSURANCE THAT I GO TO PEOPLE TO ADVISE THEM TO WEAR MASKS AND TO WASH THEIR HANDS OFTEN.”

As conditions improved and government restrictions were lifted, the community meetings resumed, and the 10 PCDs were at last completed. Lormil Claudette, a mother of two, had traveled five hours to voice her concerns about the lack of schools where she lives. Like many, Claudette was driven by the hope that she would make a difference in her community.

“I BELIEVE THAT MY PARTICIPATION IN THESE COMMUNAL WORKSHOPS CAN LEAD TO REAL CHANGE,” SHE SAID. “I WANT TO TAKE PART IN IT.”

The PCDs are getting people engaged and building assets that will translate to economic prosperity in the future.

PROMOTING URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND RESILIENCE IN HAITI

At three a.m., Roseline Dieudonné’s house is active. A widow for the past 10 years, she rises early to prepare food for her three children before school. Around six o’clock, she concludes her housework and dons her uniform to work on the 277-meter-long construction site on St. Paul Street in Limonade, one of the largest sites of PADF’s municipal development and urban resiliency project in Haiti. An optimist, Roseline keeps her spirits up with thoughts of her children for whom she would make any sacrifice. Prior to her employment at the construction site, she worked odd jobs, from selling kitchen utensils to selling second-hand clothing. However, she was without work for some time before the arrival of the PADF project in Limonade. The wage that Roseline receives is used to pay for part of her children’s schooling. “I would love to continue my work at the construction site, but it is time to allow others the opportunity. We are all in need here,” she said. Currently in the second year of its three-year duration, the project aims to reinforce the resiliency of northern communes and to improve the capabilities, infrastructures, and basic services of municipalities. Previously, in the rainy seasons, water entered houses, mosquitos and other insects swarmed, and mud would reach the ankles of residents of St. Paul Street. As threats of flooding and the effects of climate change increase, PADF is helping to alleviate these problems and improve the area, while creating jobs and building skills for residents.
Background image
Background image

BUILDING MIGRANTS’ RESILIENCY THROUGH LIVELIHOODS IN COLOMBIA

In 2020, PADF maximized efforts to ensure sustainable solutions for Venezuelan migrants and Persons in Need of International Protection (PNIP) in Colombia. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on Colombia’s residents, PADF was able to connect migrants with skills and employment training, as well as job opportunities to support themselves and continue contributing to their host communities.

3,025 PEOPLE

STRENGTHENED THEIR LIFE SKILLS
THROUGH TRAINING ON

SELF-RELIANCE

COMMUNICATION

LEADERSHIP

TEAMWORK

LEADING TO IMPROVED CAPACITIES
AND BETTER EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES.

In addition, 838 refugees and migrants received targeted skills training in construction, customer service, sales, food handling, sewing, and other technical skills. To increase understanding and encourage the employment of migrant populations, 124 businesses received training and information on regulations and laws pertaining to the employment of Venezuelan migrants and PNIP. To support sustainable livelihoods for these populations, PADF successfully facilitated the employment of 398 individuals by connecting them to stable income opportunities and the consequent social benefits guaranteed under Colombian law.
BUILDING MIGRANTS’ RESILIENCY THROUGH LIVELIHOODS IN COLOMBIA
Background image
Background image
Background image

CREATING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR VENEZUELAN MIGRANTS

María Elías Romero is a 29-year-old Venezuelan migrant who arrived in Colombia two years ago and lives in Bogotá with her husband and four children. She was a street vendor, selling sweets with her husband to maintain their family. PADF offered legal and psychosocial support along with employability training to help María Elías prepare a résumé, hone her communications skills, and register with a public employment agency. She was matched with a job and is now employed full time, receiving the legal minimum wage.
Hilda Sabino Reginfo is a Venezuelan migrant who arrived in Colombia three years ago and settled in Cartagena with her two children, husband, and mother. About a year ago, she decided to start her own business preparing typical Venezuelan corn and flour dough for arepas, empanadas, and pizza. With PADF’s support, she attended a training to sharpen her entrepreneurial skills and learned about the power of social media, door-to- door sales, and other strategies to grow her business. With the revenue of increased sales, Hilda now employs two Venezuelan migrants.
In 2017, Antonio Medina decided to leave Venezuela with his family to search for a better quality of life in Colombia. With time and effort, he was able to open a small fast-food business in Bogotá. In 2020 he participated in trainings offered by PADF and learned how to promote his business using digital marketing tools. These new skills were instrumental during the COVID-19 pandemic and allowed him to engage with his customers and communicate the safety protocols followed by his business during this critical time.

COVID-19 RESPONSE FOR VENEZUELANS IN GUYANA AND TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

In 2019, PADF launched a program to support Venezuelan migrants and refugees in Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago. The program seeks to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for Venezuelan migrants and vulnerable host communities, with activities designed to increase access to legal status, promote local integration, and improve the lives of vulnerable communities through education and psychosocial support. Soon after kicking off the program COVID-19 emerged, necessitating that PADF and its local partners swiftly shift resources to support the immediate protection needs of Venezuelan refugees and migrants by providing emergency food and shelter support that would otherwise be unavailable to Venezuelans. To do so, in Trinidad and Tobago, PADF’s local partner piloted an innovative electronic voucher system that allows participants to redeem food items within a network of 29 supermarkets around the island. In Guyana, PADF worked with local partners to pair in-kind food basket distributions with gender-based violence (GBV) prevention activities, a phenomenon exacerbated under quarantine measures. In both countries, local partners also provided emergency shelter services and rental subsidies to migrants, prioritizing victims and those at risk of GBV.

IN 2020, PADF REACHED 491 HOUSEHOLDS WITH FOOD ASSISTANCE AND 59 PERSONS WITH SHELTER SUPPORT ACROSS BOTH COUNTRIES.

This emergency support has been critical to ensuring that migrants and refugees were able to access basic rights with dignity as most Venezuelans were excluded from government assistance programs tied to the pandemic.
Background image

INTEGRATION OF VENEZUELANS IN THE CARIBBEAN THROUGH LANGUAGE

Language lessons have been, by far, one of the most successful and demanded activities of programs that seek to support the integration of Venezuelan migrants and refugees in non-Spanish speaking contexts. Under our project to support Venezuelan migrants and refugees in the Caribbean, PADF developed a dual strategy to bridge the language gap between Venezuelan refugees and migrants as well as local first responders. In Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana, PADF and its local partners virtually facilitated English as a Second Language (ESL) trainer-of-trainer courses for teachers in communities with a high concentration of Venezuelan children. PADF and its partners also provided ESL lessons to Venezuelan refugees and migrants throughout both countries. Finally, PADF and partners offered basic Spanish courses for local first responders from government agencies and local civil society organizations so that they could provide better services to Venezuelan migrants. In total, PADF reached nearly 500 persons with virtual language courses in 2020.

A STORY OF HOPE

To mark World Children’s Day in November 2020, PADF produced “A Story of Hope”, a bilingual children’s illustration book that tells the story of Venezuelan migration to the Caribbean through the experience of Gabriela and her mother. The book is tailored to young readers and introduces the topic of migration with hopes of generating positive conversations regarding migration in safe learning spaces, as well as within their homes.
A STORY OF HOPE

SUPPORTING COLOMBIA’S HEALTH SECTOR TO RESPOND TO VENEZUELAN MIGRATION

In 2020, PADF supported local health systems in Colombia in their efforts to provide basic health care services to meet the needs of Venezuelan migrants and their host communities amidst COVID-19 psychological impacts of displacement and isolation during the pandemic. To this end, PADF trained 147 health care professionals and administrators on the provision of psychosocial care and emergency health support to migrant populations, and on strategies and methods to identify gender-based violence when treating vulnerable subsets of the population such as women, children, and adolescents. To address the challenges and gaps within existing local health systems, PADF and local partners conducted targeted health fairs.

THESE HEALTH FAIRS PROVIDED BASIC PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE SERVICES TO

1,774 INDIVIDUALS

OTHERWISE UNABLE TO ACCESS KEY SERVICES

Similarly, PADF prioritized support for pregnant and lactating Venezuelan women, providing prenatal care to migrant women who were unable to access state-covered prenatal services due to a lack of status. As a result, 242 pregnant and lactating women received vital healthcare that ensured their wellbeing and that of their infants. Lastly, as COVID-19 continued to isolate and put unseen pressures on people’s mental health, PADF strengthened its psychosocial care and support services for vulnerable populations. In Colombia, PADF provided 4,698 families with professional psychosocial support, teaching coping mechanisms to better confront existing trauma and the psychological impacts of displacement and isolation during the pandemic.
SUPPORTING COLOMBIA’S HEALTH SECTOR TO RESPOND TO VENEZUELAN MIGRATION

Disaster Resilience

Building resilient communities and delivering aid during emergencies

Learn more
Disaster Resilience

DELIVERING AID TO VICTIMS OF HURRICANES ETA AND IOTA IN CENTRAL AMERICA

In November 2020, two powerful Category-4 hurricanes pummeled countries across Central America. Hurricane Eta arrived first, followed by Hurricane Iota. Just two weeks apart, both storms carved a nearly identical path of destruction across Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and several neighboring countries. The storms affected nine million Central Americans, forcing more than 400,000 from their homes and into shelters. In their wake, crops and vital infrastructure were destroyed and millions of people were left without access to food, water, shelter, electricity, and other basic services. PADF and its local partners visited the hardest-hit areas in Guatemala and Honduras and prioritized the delivery of assistance to low-income and female headed households, the elderly, and members of indigenous communities who had not previously received other assistance. PADF delivered staple foods, personal hygiene kits, and sanitation supplies to prevent the spread of COVID-19. In Guatemala, PADF delivered assistance in partnership with the Secretariat for Women’s Affairs, while coordinating distribution efforts with members of the National Association of Non-Governmental Organizations in Honduras.

IN TOTAL, PADF DELIVERED

14,454 POUNDS

of staple foods, personal hygiene products, and cleaning supplies to 270 families, or 1,350 individuals

Meal kits included rice and beans, oats, oil, canned meats, sugar, and other cooking essentials, while personal hygiene and cleaning products included hand sanitizer and soap, laundry detergent, bleach, sanitary napkins, diapers, toilet paper, and reusable protective face masks.

“I wish to thank PADF for being here during this emergency, especially since the support provided by the government has not been able to reach all the families affected by the tropical storms. There are many families here that need assistance and thankfully you chose to help our community.” – Román M.

BUILDING RESILIENT COMMUNITY CENTERS IN PUERTO RICO

In 2017, Hurricanes Irma and Maria caused severe disruptions to the supply of water, electricity, food, and communications services, exacerbating the human suffering caused by these devastating storms. For months, millions of Puerto Ricans were left without reliable access to power and potable water, hindering their ability to rebuild and recover. The absence of these basic services also contributed to the spread of infectious diseases and numerous untimely deaths. Following the hurricanes, PADF launched an effort to build back the island to become stronger and more resilient to future disasters. With local partner Para la Naturaleza (PLN), PADF made infrastructure upgrades at 20 community centers across the island, including the installation of solar energy, rainwater collection and filtration systems, and additional small-scale infrastructure improvements. Through these improvements, PADF and PLN expanded access to energy and clean drinking water across the island. By focusing on community centers, the initiative enhanced not only access to energy and water, but also improved the delivery of free meals for low-income families, youth educational programs, health care, legal aid, and other social services to over 90,000 people in the surrounding communities. The infrastructure investments also enabled the centers to reduce their energy costs and direct additional resources to serve underserved members of their communities. In early 2020, the community centers were put to the test when several powerful earthquakes rocked Puerto Rico. Thanks to their ability to produce electricity and clean drinking water, the PADF-supported community centers in the hardest hit areas were able to remain operational and quickly converted into humanitarian distribution hubs. “We are able to expand our reach of first response in the case of another emergency,” said Pastor Laura Ayala from Primera Iglesia Bautista. “We can also offer crucial services like refrigeration of medicine and food. Moreover, we’ll be able to expand our hours of operation to ensure we can reach more people facing another crisis.”
BUILDING RESILIENT COMMUNITY CENTERS IN PUERTO RICO
Background image

REDUCING FLOOD RISK IN THE TWIN TOWNS, BELIZE

Every year, increasingly intense storms endanger the lives of thousands of Belizeans and threaten their efforts to achieve greater economic and social progress. To reduce disaster risk, PADF supported small-scale infrastructure improvements to foster more effective drainage and reduce the effects of flooding on households in low-lying areas. PADF introduced local authorities and residents to mobile-based data collection tools that enabled the rapid collection of georeferenced data on flood susceptibility and to inform decision making regarding where to prioritize infrastructure improvements. Over 15,000 residents benefited from drainage improvements completed during the project. As part of this project, PADF led the development of mobile-based survey tools to support the mapping of community lifelines in flood-prone areas. This effort improved understanding of the risks facing community facilities that deliver vital services, such as access to clean drinking water, electricity, transportation, health care, and public safety. PADF sees that lifelines are essential to disaster resilience given their ability to provide life- sustaining support for residents before, during, and after disasters. Finally, PADF held educational campaigns on emergency preparedness and the dangers of littering and the use of single-use plastics, as these can often contribute to poor drainage and flooding during intense storms.

“By engaging government officials, university students and children leaders in direct implementation, PADF has aligned strategic alliances among local actors and built a robust foundation for flood risk reduction measures in San Ignacio and Santa Elena Towns,” said Project Director Dr. Minerva Pinelo.

Environment

Planting the seeds for a greener, sustainable future

Learn more
Environment

MITIGATING DEFORESTATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION IN HAITI

On a sunny day in the mountains of Haiti, agronomist Louisma Colomb ran his fingers through a bucket full of coffee seeds.

“WE PLANT BLUE MOUNTAIN COFFEE, WHICH IS HIGHLY PRIZED AND SOUGHT AFTER AROUND THE WORLD BECAUSE OF ITS GOOD QUALITY,” HE EXPLAINED.

Louisma is a project coordinator for Solidarité Haïtienne pour le Développement Rural de Kenscoff (SOHADERK), a local Haitian organization working to address deforestation. In Haiti, economic strain has contributed to a long history of severe deforestation and environmental degradation, but organizations like SOHADERK are disrupting that pattern. They train farmers to use an agroforestry model to plant coffee seedlings and fruit and forest trees on their plots. Planting trees helps to prevent erosion and improve soil conditions, contributing to the long-term sustainability of farmland. The trees also produce high-value cash crops of coffee and fruit that increase farmers’ incomes. Altogether, the model benefits both the farmers and the forests. SOHADERK was one of nine Haitian organizations that received a grant and technical assistance through PADF’s reforestation project. With this support, SOHADERK produced over 400,000 seedlings in their nurseries and trained 347 farmers on topics such as how to install and manage a coffee plot, control shade, space crops when planting, and manage pests.

THROUGH THE NINE SUBGRANTEE PROJECTS, OVER

1.3 MILLION

trees were planted, and 407 hectares of land are now managed under agroforestry systems.

PADF also worked with local organization Jardin Botanique des Cayes (JBC) to provide environmental education to students, teachers, and their surrounding communities. JBC trained 70 students in seven schools on the consequences of deforestation, the importance and benefits of trees, and techniques for tree planting and maintenance. Equipped with this new knowledge, these youth will help build a better, greener future for Haiti.
MITIGATING DEFORESTATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION IN HAITI

PROMOTING TRANSPARENCY IN THE EXTRACTIVE SECTOR IN ECUADOR

Transparency and accountability are critical to the development of a robust extractive sector. PADF worked alongside civil society and public and private partners in Ecuador to secure the adoption of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). This initiative aims to promote a global standard for the good governance of oil, gas, and mineral resources. Ecuador officially joined the EITI in October 2020, and the Ecuadorian government is now required to publicly disclose information on contracts, beneficial owners, revenues and payments, information on state-owned enterprises, and data related to gender and environmental payments. These disclosures will support ongoing efforts to publish better, more accessible, and more timely data on Ecuador’s extractive sector. “We must highlight the valuable support from international organizations such as the Pan American Development Foundation during this process. These organizations were critical to Ecuador’s acceptance into the EITI (...) as well as PADF’s guidance in the development of a workplan and operational regulation,” – Energy and Non-Renewable Natural Resources Minister René Ortiz. PADF will continue to provide strategic support to its partners during the initial 18-month period in which Ecuador must comply with the EITI requirements.

ECUADOR’S RATIFICATION OF LANDMARK ENVIRONMENTAL AGREEMENT

PADF reached a significant milestone in its efforts to promote transparency in environmental matters and protect the rights of indigenous populations in Ecuador. As a result of coordinated advocacy and awareness raising with our local partners, Ecuador officially submitted to the United Nations (UN) its ratification of the Escazu Agreement, a regional agreement on access to information, public participation, and justice in environmental matters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Signed in Costa Rica in 2018, the agreement has now been ratified by 12 countries and will become effective in April 2021. This landmark international instrument will have implications beyond Ecuador and will constitute a useful advocacy tool to promote environmental protection and human rights throughout the region. PADF’s awareness raising campaigns and advocacy initiatives highlighted the importance of ratifying this agreement to improve access to information in environmental matters, protect environmental defenders, and promote the rights of vulnerable populations affected by environmental degradation, such as indigenous groups. PADF’s partners engaged the public sector, including the executive branch and the National Assembly, along with media, academia, and civil society to underscore the significance of the agreement. On February 4, 2020, Ecuador’s National Assembly passed a resolution approving the agreement, which led to Ecuador’s official ratification through its UN mission in May. Now that this key milestone has been achieved, PADF and its partners will continue to advocate for the effective implementation of the agreement and the protection of environmental and indigenous rights in Ecuador.
ECUADOR’S RATIFICATION OF LANDMARK ENVIRONMENTAL AGREEMENT

STEM Education

Transitioning to virtual learning and amplifying the role of 21st century skills

Learn more
STEM Education

FIRST LADY OF PANAMA NAMED PADF GOODWILL AMBASSADOR FOR STEM EDUCATION

In October, we announced the appointment of First Lady of Panama Yazmín Colón de Cortizo as PADF’s Goodwill Ambassador for STEM Education. In this new role, First Lady Colón de Cortizo will promote STEM education as a strategy to build the skills of students across Latin America, especially girls, for the 21st century.

“EDUCATION PROVIDES A SOCIAL LEVEL PLAYING FIELD, WHICH IS WHY THE GOVERNMENT OF PANAMA IS COMMITTED TO PROMOTING QUALITY EDUCATION FOR ALL. IT IS A GREAT HONOR TO REPRESENT SUCH AN IMPORTANT MISSION. THE PANDEMIC HAS SHOWN THAT WITH INNOVATION AND COOPERATION WE CAN TURN ANY CRISIS INTO AN OPPORTUNITY, AS WE HAVE BEEN DOING. WE MUST UNITE SO THAT STUDENTS FROM OUR REGION HAVE THE EDUCATION THEY DESERVE,” SAID FIRST LADY COLÓN DE CORTIZO.

The official designation event was attended by the First Ladies of Argentina, Brazil, Honduras, and Paraguay, all of whom delivered remarks in support of STEM education.
Background image

SMOOTH TRANSITION TO VIRTUAL LEARNING

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, PADF and local partners made a swift transition to a virtual learning environment with STEM programming.

SINCE MARCH 2020, MORE THAN

56,000 STUDENTS

HAVE PARTICIPATED IN STEM PROGRAMS AND OVER 500 TEACHERS HAVE BEEN TRAINED IN STEM METHODOLOGIES.

PADF’s STEM Americas program is now active in 10 countries: ARGENTINA - BOLIVIA - CHILE - COLOMBIA - ECUADOR - MEXICO - PANAMA - PARAGUAY - PERU - URUGUAY Our STEM education partner in Colombia, the non-profit Cipsela, offered virtual aerospace workshops to more than 100 students between the ages of 12 and 17 in the municipalities of Rionegro, Bello, and La Dorada. In the inaugural My First Satellite and Wing Challenge, Martín Melguizo used what he learned in programming, as well as his previous knowledge in electronics, to build a prototype satellite capable of deploying its panels remotely using sensors and electronics. He then presented the success of his invention to an evaluation committee, further developing his presentation skills – essential in STEM fields. In another challenge, the Large Wing Challenge, Martín managed to build a prototype with a wingspan of 229 centimeters, using only ordinary white paper, by applying the same engineering concepts used in the construction of actual airplane wings. In Argentina and Uruguay, PADF partner Fundación Ciencia Joven offered students the opportunity to participate in an innovative 12-month STEM program, Academias Ciencia Joven en Casa, encouraging them to carry out research and hands-on projects with their peers. By transitioning online, students like Milagros, a 15-year-old girl with Down syndrome from General Ramírez, province of Entre Ríos, in Argentina were able to learn about STEM, teamwork, and leadership skills.
SMOOTH TRANSITION TO VIRTUAL LEARNING

CLOSING THE GENDER GAP IN STEM

PADF works to close the gender gap in STEM by sparking the interest of girls in science and technology and promoting hands-on learning through our innovative STEM Americas program. To nurture the next generation of women in STEM, we train teachers and develop stimulating lesson plans that ignite curiosity and engage girls in creative ways.

One of them was 15-year-old Laura Ospina of Colombia, who has been enrolled in STEM classes since 2019. She remembers when recruiters from PADF STEM education partner organization Cipsela went to her school to invite students to join a new aerospace workshop. They spoke of airplanes and the space shuttle, among other things. Laura was curious and decided to sign up.

In the past two years, she has learned more than just physics and math concepts, she has learned about aircrafts and how to operate flight simulators. Laura used the Microsoft Flight Simulator X – STEAM Edition to learn how to fly a Boeing 737.

CLOSING THE GENDER GAP IN STEM

IN 2020, WE OFFERED STEM TRAINING TO

28,556 GIRLS

IN 2020, WE OFFERED STEM TRAINING TO

“I WAS SO EXCITED BECAUSE I HAVE NEVER BEEN IN AN AIRPLANE BEFORE. SOMETIMES THE FLIGHT SIMULATIONS DID NOT GO AS PLANNED, BUT I THINK IT WAS GOOD FOR ME TO EXPERIENCE THAT, BECAUSE THAT HAPPENS IN REAL LIFE.” —Laura Ospina, STEM Americas participant, Colombia

Background image

Democracy, Governance,
and Human Rights

Advancing the rights of the most vulnerable

Learn more
Democracy, Governance, and Human Rights

PROMOTING FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION

In 2020, the Voces del Sur network of Latin American organizations monitoring violations to freedom of the press continued to grow, with participation of 13 countries. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Voces del Sur published regional guidelines on how to report on the topic. The guidelines follow safety and protection recommendations from the World Health Organization and offer tips on finding reliable sources, combating disinformation, and using appropriate language and images that are factual and informative. Voces del Sur also monitored measures implemented by governments to curb the spread of COVID-19 and their impact on freedom of expression and access to information. The network led advocacy campaigns to denounce some of these regulations, resulting in changes to Emergency Decree 02620 in Peru, which limited access to public information during the state of emergency, and the repeal of Decree 4321 in Bolivia, which stipulated that people who disseminated information that endangered public health would be prosecuted.

ADVANCING LABOR RIGHTS IN CENTRAL AMERICA

In the Northern Triangle of Central America, eight out of 10 businesses are part of the vast informal economy, where labor rights of youth, women, and unskilled workers are ignored, due to precarious working conditions, low wages, and a lack of social security. To strengthen the skills of entrepreneurs and enable them to create decent jobs and better working conditions, PADF’s Regional Human Rights and Democracy Program is implementing, in collaboration with the International Labour Organization (ILO), the “Formalize and Improve Your Business” pilot project in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras.

THE PROJECT HAS REACHED

106 BUSINESS OWNERS

IN 2020,

following an in-depth study and a strategy that includes online tools, group training, and individual counselling.

Alba Luz Germán is a young and determined survivor of domestic violence. She is also the owner of Alba’s Bakery, a start-up that received support and is now growing and on the path to the formal economy. Eneyda Alfaro, another young entrepreneur, runs Status, a cosmetics and clothing business. When the pandemic hit, she lost her regular job and signed up for the pilot project. Now, her e-commerce is expanding, and she no longer needs to work for others.

“Most businesses are owned by men, but I’ve grown as a person and I’m now independent,”, said Eneyda. “When I worked with other companies, they wouldn’t cover any benefits. For my own employees, I want to fulfill my obligations, and one of my priorities is to register with the national social security system.”

ADVANCING LABOR RIGHTS IN CENTRAL AMERICA
Background image
“IT HASN’T BEEN EASY. I SUFFERED SO MUCH VIOLENCE. BUT NOW, I’M FINANCIALLY INDEPENDENT AND I CAN SHARE THIS ACHIEVEMENT WITH MY EMPLOYEES. THERE IS NO LIMIT TO WHAT I CAN DO, AND THE GROWTH PATH IS ALWAYS IN MY MIND.” – Alba Luz German, owner, Alba’s Bakery
Background image

SUPPORTING CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES IN MEXICO

José Juan, a 12-year-old with disabilities, needs daily medication to prevent life-threatening seizures. He lives in Juchitán in Oaxaca, Mexico with his grandparents and mother, who has a learning disability. The family has limited resources and relies on the grandfather’s income to cover their basic needs including food and the many medications that are needed for José’s treatment. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, José and 45 other children with disabilities from the city of Juchitán received services from a specialized education center offering instruction and rehabilitation services, which was rebuilt with support from PADF after the earthquakes that affected the area in 2017. During the pandemic, many adults from these low-income families have lost their jobs and the children have been unable to receive in-person education and rehabilitation services.

45 children with disabilities

received services from a specialized education center offering

INSTRUCTION AND REHABILITATION SERVICES

To mitigate the health and economic impacts of the pandemic, PADF raised funds for the purchase of groceries and medicines to support these children with disabilities. For six consecutive months, PADF offered financial support to José’s family, ensuring that he received his daily medication and food.
SUPPORTING CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES IN MEXICO

“The support you have given my nephew has helped him a lot because now he is more at ease and my family has one less thing to worry about.”

Background image
Background image

MITIGATING FOOD INSECURITY

Gabriela Trujillo is a 45-year-old domestic worker in Mexico City. She has worked in the same house for 22 years. At the start of the pandemic, her employer notified her that they could not pay her entire wage; however, they would support her with food and would allow her husband and son to live in her workplace. Even so, Gabriela and her family did not have enough resources to meet all their needs and lived with the uncomfortable feeling of not having their own food and supplies. This situation led Gabriela to seek help from the Domestic Workers’ Support and Training Center, one of PADF’s partners in Mexico, where she started to receive information on the rights she was entitled to.

DOMESTIC WORKERS ARE AMONG THE MOST VULNERABLE GROUPS IN LATIN AMERICA AND WERE DISPROPORTIONALLY AFFECTED BY THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC. TO MITIGATE THIS SITUATION, PADF DISTRIBUTED FOOD BASKETS TO DOMESTIC WORKERS IN MEXICO.

Gabriela was among those who benefited and said that this help “meant a lot,” since she could meet her family’s basic nutrition needs for the month. In fact, these groceries were shared with her extended family who were unemployed and did not have any support.
MITIGATING FOOD INSECURITY

Peace, Justice, and Security

Creating safe environments and building trust

Learn more
Peace, Justice, and Security

HELPING AT-RISK YOUTH FIND JOB SECURITY AND NEWFOUND CONFIDENCE IN THE CARIBBEAN

Ulana Joseph, 21, lives with a health condition known as sickle cell anemia. She was diagnosed at 11 and struggled to keep up with school and secure a steady income due to her continuous need for medical attention. Yet, she has always dreamed of becoming a doctor. After participating in a PADF employability training program in Guyana, Ulana was offered an entry-level job at Pizza Hut, where she has rotated through various workstations and learned about different aspects of food preparation. She knows there is hard work ahead, but with her newfound confidence and job security, Ulana plans to enroll in medical school at the University of Guyana by 2023.

“The program has been able to create a space for so many young people from so many backgrounds, without judgement of their circumstances. It’s the first program I’ve encountered that does not discriminate, but accepts and acknowledges young people where they are,”
– Ulana’s coach, Stacey Gordon.

Using a community-based, peer-to-peer approach that includes training in soft skills, employability skills, and reproductive health, the curriculum was adapted for the Caribbean setting. The program included follow-on coaching and mentoring to strengthen job-seeking opportunities for the young people trained, ages 17-29, as well as job retention. Once trained, youth received support from life coaches in job placement and workplace coaching for up to one year.

330 YOUTH

WERE TRAINED IN SAINT LUCIA AND GUYANA

Background image

IMPROVING SECURITY IN RURAL COMMUNITIES IN COLOMBIA

Decades of armed conflict in Colombia have led to a lack of trust between police and rural communities, exacerbated by the limitations of addressing security challenges in isolated territories. To improve relations between law enforcement and rural communities, PADF supports the Directorate of Rural Security (DICAR) in creating solutions to improve citizen security in rural areas of Colombia. One of the main objectives of the project is to support the technological modernization of rural policing through the strengthening of DICAR’s technology system, the Integrated Rural Operational Control Center (CICOR). Initially, we purchased equipment for CICOR that would allow DICAR to conduct criminal analyses on operations to counteract the crimes that deter security in rural areas.

HOWEVER, PADF NOT ONLY OUTFITTED DICAR WITH HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE, BUT ALSO DEVELOPED AN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (ICT) SYSTEM, KNOWN AS SIDCAR, THAT STRENGTHENS THE ABILITY TO PLAN, ANALYZE, AND DISSEMINATE SECURITY INFORMATION, AND RESPOND TO THE UNIQUE NEEDS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT IN RURAL COMMUNITIES.

Through the ICT application, law enforcement can better receive information from citizens and swiftly respond to and prevent future security challenges. DICAR now has a modern platform, making use of current technologies, to integrate geographical and institutional databases to meet rural citizen security needs and provide effective service.
Background image

WITNESS PROTECTION AND VICTIM CARE IN BELIZE

This vital program seeks to increase assistance to persons eligible for witness protection and who may be unwilling to testify and cooperate during criminal proceedings.

The program is aimed at:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE STAKEHOLDERS

such as the police, prosecution, and law enforcement authorities

CITIZENS

who may be victims or witnesses of crimes

Unfortunately, many victims and witnesses are unable to participate in the criminal proceedings, significantly impacting case backlog and making it more difficult for cases to be concluded. The relatively small size of Belize and cost of implementing witness protection present additional challenges to the program. PADF has facilitated two high-level virtual roundtable meetings on witness protection and victim care for the criminal justice sector of the Belize Police Prosecution Professionalization Program. The impressive turnout at the meetings indicates a commitment of direct engagement and buy-in by leading stakeholders to ensure the necessary reforms to the legislative framework in the support, assistance, and protection to victims and witnesses, and the effective implementation of existing legislation.
WITNESS PROTECTION AND VICTIM CARE IN BELIZE

INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO PREVENTING TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS IN GUATEMALA

PADF aims to prevent and respond to trafficking in persons (TIP) in Guatemala by educating and empowering local women in the Western Highlands to prevent TIP in their communities and providing government agencies and local organizations the knowledge and skills they need to attend to victims of trafficking. Key to these efforts are specialized training cycles tailored to the needs of participants, but in March the COVID-19 pandemic upended PADF’s plans as the government implemented restrictions on gatherings and domestic travel, making in-person training impossible. In response to the new reality, PADF decided early on to move all TIP training online and to work with participants virtually – a bold move for a project focused on areas where Internet penetration is low. Local staff worked tirelessly to adapt training content to online learning, support and upgrade government e-training platforms, and reach out to local communities. In the following months, PADF implemented not one but three successful online trainings for a total of almost 400 people – one on prevention for rural women from the Western Highlands, another for public servants working with child victims, and a third for local organizations and government agencies. Critical to this success was providing participants credit to access the Internet and participate via smartphones, setting up support and discussion groups through text apps such as WhatsApp, and conducting one-on-one follow-up with participants to troubleshoot issues and keep them engaged.
“WE CAME TO FEEL LIKE A FAMILY,” SAID A PARTICIPANT FROM RURAL HUEHUETENANGO. “AND I RECOGNIZE THE IMPORTANCE OF THE TOPIC OF TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS. I AM GOING TO SHARE THIS KNOWLEDGE WITH OTHER PEOPLE, SINCE KNOWLEDGE NOT SHARED IS EMPTY.”
Background image

EMPOWERING YOUTH LEADERS TO CHALLENGE GENDER NORMS IN PARAGUAY AND BRAZIL

PADF is promoting the prevention of gender-based violence (GBV) in Paraguay and two border cities in Brazil, Foz do Iguaçu and Ponta Porã, by empowering adolescents and youth to identify and address harmful sociocultural norms and increasing the capacity of local organizations. We believe that with the necessary knowledge, skills, and resources, adolescents and youth will feel empowered to challenge gender norms early in life. With the support of civil society organizations, the next generation of advocates will be prepared to mobilize societal support to shift gender norms and prevent GBV. PADF is also working with a partner organization to develop a GBV prevention manual that will serve as the core curriculum for a training of trainer’s course for youth leaders across Paraguay and in the two targeted cities in Brazil. After these youth leaders are certified through a master training course, they will replicate GBV prevention workshops for adolescents and youth throughout Paraguay and the two communities in Brazil using a peer-to-peer methodology.
EMPOWERING YOUTH LEADERS TO CHALLENGE GENDER NORMS IN PARAGUAY AND BRAZIL
“THIS PROJECT IS GOING TO HAVE A VERY POSITIVE IMPACT ON RURAL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE SPACES TO DISCUSS THESE TOPICS.” – Participant “THANKS FOR LISTENING TO US. NORMALLY YOUTH OPINIONS ARE NOT TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT.” – Participant
Background image

Our Impact

In 2020, PADF was hard at work for the most vulnerable communities in Latin America and the Caribbean

Our Impact
Background image

Health, Nutrition, and Economic Opportunities

Health, Nutrition, and Economic Opportunities
Reaching

1.1 million

people with WASH and infection prevention supplies, messages, psychosocial support and primary healthcare _____________________ Providing direct cash/in-kind financial aid and/or food assistance to

104,433

households/people _____________________ Ensuring that

23,310

vulnerable people are food secure _____________________

300,180

people received health and nutrition assistance _____________________ Psychosocial support for

7,960

people _____________________ Nutrition support for

61,032

people _____________________ Humanitarian assistance for

87,228

people _____________________ Access to healthcare for

143,960

people
Background image

Environment and
Disaster Resilience

Environment and Disaster Resilience
Improving access to more sustainable and environmentally friendly livelihoods for

4,554

individuals or families _____________________ Helping

2,291

families adopt environmentally friendly behaviors _____________________

69,721

vulnerable people helped adopt preparedness measures to protect lives and livelihood assets _____________________ Supporting

17

institutions

Democracy, Governance,
and Human Rights

Democracy, Governance, and Human Rights
Training

3,656

human rights defenders _____________________ Strengthening

160+

public or private Institutions _____________________ Supporting advocacy initiatives of

60

civil society organizations
Background image

Peace, Justice,
and Security

Peace, Justice, and Security
Producing

1,279

learning products _____________________ Training

32,152

people _____________________ Providing direct services to

8,089

vulnerable individuals _____________________ Supporting

125

institutions

STEM Education

STEM Education

56,567

students reached through STEM workshops and activities _____________________ Promoting gender equality by offering STEM training to

28,556

girls

SUPPORTERS

PRIVATE SECTOR

Bayerische Motoren Werke AG (BMW) Finsbury Glover Hering Fortinet Gilead Sciences, Inc. PepsiCo Royal Caribbean Cruises Group (RCL) The Boeing Company (Boeing) VISA

PUBLIC SECTOR

European Union

EUROSAN

Government of Canada

Global Affairs Canada (DFATD)

Government of Colombia

Asociación Colombiana del Petróleo (ACP) Agencia Nacional de Hidrocarburos (ANH) Agencia Nacional de Tierras (ANT) Fondo Colombia en Paz Ministerio de Justicia y del Derecho

Government of Taiwan

Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO)

Government of Sweden

Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation

Government of the United States

Department of State

Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs Office of Economic and Development Affairs Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons

United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean, Office of Food for Peace Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean, Office of Regional Sustainable Development USAID Colombia USAID Eastern and Southern Caribbean USAID Ecuador USAID El Salvador USAID Haiti

MULTILATERALS

Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH) World Bank Group

TRUSTEES

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS


Luis Almagro Lemes, Chairman Secretary General, Organization of American States

Ambassador Nestor Mendez, Vice Chairman Assistant Secretary General, Organization of American States
“THE UNPRECEDENTED CHALLENGES POSED BY THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC MAKE THE PADF-OAS PARTNERSHIP MORE CRITICAL THAN EVER. WE STAND TOGETHER TO DELIVER ON OUR JOINT COMMITMENT TO THE OAS PRINCIPLES OF SOCIAL JUSTICE AND SOCIAL SECURITY.” – Ambassador Mendez
Background image

BOARD MEMBERS

Kathleen C. Barclay, President German Herrera, 1st Vice President, Chair, Governance and Nominations Committee Gilbert Casellas, 2nd Vice President, Chair, Finance and Audit Committee Sandra M. Guazzotti, Treasurer Alexandra Aguirre, Secretary & General Counsel, Vice Chair, Governance and Nominations Committee Philippe R. Armand Judy Brown Julianne Canavaggio Jean-Pierre L. Conte Stephen Donehoo Nicholas Galt Emil R. Infante Steve Liston (Chair, Planning and Programs Committee) Roberto Matus Robert M. McGee Mina Pacheco Nazemi (Chair, Growth and Communications Committee) André Pousada Dante Ramos Luis A. Ubiñas

FINANCIALS

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES FISCAL YEAR 2020
FINANCIALS
Background image

A HEMISPHERE OF OPPORTUNITY.
FOR ALL.

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

The Pan American Development Foundation (PADF) believes in creating a hemisphere of opportunity, for all. We work across Latin America and the Caribbean to make our region stronger—more healthy, peaceful, just, inclusive, resilient, and sustainable for current and future generations. For nearly 60 years, we have served the most vulnerable communities, investing resources throughout the hemisphere. We partner with and enable civil society, governments, and the private sector for the greater good of the region.
A HEMISPHERE OF OPPORTUNITY. FOR ALL. 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

2020 Annual Report Download

English French Portuguese Spanish

Connect with us!