Matthew

After Hurricane Matthew: Jude's Story

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    Jude Jasmin with his wife, Alexandra Pierre, who is eight months pregnant.

Jude Jasmin with his wife, Alexandra Pierre, who is eight months pregnant.

On a recent Saturday morning, a funeral convoy is slowly making its way to the cemetery. It’s 8:00 a.m. and heavy clouds prevent the sun from shining over the village of Roseaux, southwest Haiti.  Coconuts trees have lost their leaves, banana and mango trees litter the ground. Like many of the buildings in this seaside town, the Catholic church has lost a significant part of its roof. 

People begin lining up in front of the public school as two PADF trucks with humanitarian aid approach. Women, elderly, and disabled people receive priority in line. Perched on his crutch, Jude Jasmin waits patiently for his turn to enter the school yard. Residents are givven a choice between a food kit or a personal hygiene kit. Jude emerges from the crowd with a hygiene kit including soap, toothpaste, water treatment tablets and other items.

“I chose this kit because to be in good health, one has to cultivate proper hygiene,” he says. “To me, these are important and I am pleased.”

Jude receives a hygiene kit from the PADF aid truck.

Jude receives a hygiene kit from the PADF aid truck.

Jude lives near the Catholic church. Today, his house is made of a few metal sheets, wood planks, and a tarp.  Humbly, he invites us inside.  His wife, Alexandra, is eight months pregnant. She sits on an uncomfortable bed made of wooden planks and covered with fabric scraps. 

“We live here,” Jude says.  With emotion, he recounts the night of horror when Hurricane Matthew struck. 

“We were in bed when hurricane force winds started blowing very loudly. A tree broke and landed on the roof of our little house,” Jude says. A branch hit him on the shin.

Since that night, Jude can hardly walk.  He can’t work as a moto-taxi driver anymore so he has been unable to provide for his pregnant wife.  Jude's father has been disabled for several years. He manages to feed himself thanks to his mother, who lives next door.  Jude and his wife are still living in their damaged house. His mother’s house also suffered extensive damage due to Hurricane Matthew. 

“The metal sheets went out in all directions and we were so scared,” she says, sitting on the floor stirring a pot. 

Jude does not know the sex of his child yet.  He can’t afford to pay for the sonogram.  He hopes his foot heals quickly so he can resume work in order to fulfill his role as a father.

Jude invites the camera into his parent's home after Hurricane Matthew.

Haiti Donor Spotlight: Omega Phi Beta Sorority Binghamton

Sisters of Omega Phi Beta pose with m  embers of the Lambda Alpha Upsilon Fraternity, which won the stroll competition.

Sisters of Omega Phi Beta pose with members of the Lambda Alpha Upsilon Fraternity, which won the stroll competition.

Students at SUNY Binghamton are dancing for charity. Last month, the university's Omega Phi Beta Sorority collaborated with the Haitian Student Association to hold the ninth annual “Strolling for a Cause" fundraising event. Proceeds went to the Pan American Development Foundation's relief efforts in Haiti after Hurricane Matthew.

"We feel strongly about giving back to our community in the Binghamton area but also outside of our community," says Maritza Minchala, president of the Delta Chapter of Omega Phi Beta Sorority.

"We really appreciate the work PADF participates in. This motivated us to go above and beyond to make this event a success."

As part of the event, fraternities and sororities perform a “stroll," a dance that shows unity among Greek organizations, Maritza explains.

The group raised nearly $900 for Haiti. Proceeds mainly came from the $3 entrance fee at the event. 

PADF is providing humanitarian aid to communities in Southwest Haiti affected by hurricane Matthew. To date, the Foundation has delivered hygiene kits, emergency food kits, bottled water and water purification tablets to more than 23,000 people.

"We really hope that our donation will help out in any way possible," Maritza says.

PADF is grateful for the commitment, passion and support of our donors. Do you have a fundraising story? E-mail us at connect@padf.org.

Sisters of Omega Phi Beta Sorority with members of the Haitian Student Association, Binghamton University - SUNY.

Sisters of Omega Phi Beta Sorority with members of the Haitian Student Association, Binghamton University - SUNY.

Maritza Minchala, president of Omega Phi Beta Sorority (left) and Chelsea Lindor, president of the Haitian Student Association. kick off the show.

Maritza Minchala, president of Omega Phi Beta Sorority (left) and Chelsea Lindor, president of the Haitian Student Association. kick off the show.

After Matthew: A Mother in Camp Perrin

Photos: Carmelie Montuma

Marie Vanité is a single mother of four children in Camp Perrin, southern Haiti. Before Hurricane Matthew she was struggling to make ends meet. Her husband left her when she was pregnant with her eldest child, who is 16 years old. Her small, two-bedroom home was destroyed in Hurricane Matthew. 

While running away from her house to escape the hurricane, Marie was hit by a piece of flying debris a metal sheet and cut her hand.  She has been a washer woman for the past 26 years. Lately she isn't able to work because of the injury.

“My life is over," she told PADF. "My hands are all I had to feed my kids and provide them with the little that I could, but it’s all over now.  We are all sleeping at a neighbor’s. Until when, I don’t know.”

Matthew was the worst hurricane to strike Haiti in more than 50 years. It has left more than 1.4 million people in need of humanitarian aid. Learn about PADF's relief efforts to assist people like Marie.

Life in Camp Perrin After Hurricane Matthew

Joseph St. Fort lost everything when Hurricane Matthew ripped through the town of Camp Perrin, southwest Haiti. (Jeanty Junior Augustin)

Camp Perrin, Haiti

Joseph St. Fort, 64, has weathered many storms. Hurricane Cleo in 1964, was particularly bad. But nothing like this. Hurricane Matthew has been the worst, he says.  

"We’ve lost everything, but thank God we are still alive."

His home was destroyed after a tree fell on top of it during Hurricane Matthew, a Category 4 storm that made landfall in southwest Haiti last week.

There has been no tap water since the hurricane. The water that Joseph and his neighbors are drinking is contaminated and causes diarrhea.

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   Adrienne Pierre (left) has been drinking contaminated water since Hurricane Matthew struck.   (Jeanty Junior Augustin)

Adrienne Pierre (left) has been drinking contaminated water since Hurricane Matthew struck. (Jeanty Junior Augustin)

"We need the water to be treated," says Adrienne Pierre, a mother of five who rented a room from Joseph. "It has been contaminated by dead leaves and microbes."

They haven't received food aid yet, Joseph says. And getting back on their feet will be tough, as all the livestock was swept away.

"We’ve lost everything. Goats, sheep, even our chicken."

Children stand listlessly around their mothers. They aren't able to go to school. 

Joseph St. Fort and his neighbors in Camp Perrin, Haiti. (Jeanty Junior Augustin)

Joseph St. Fort and his neighbors in Camp Perrin, Haiti. (Jeanty Junior Augustin)

"All their books are wet," says a neighbor woman. "Everything is wet—shoes, uniforms. They are not going to school."

Many communities are still drying out after Hurricane Matthew brought high winds, extensive flooding and as much as 40 inches of rain. (Jeanty Junior Augustin)

Many communities are still drying out after Hurricane Matthew brought high winds, extensive flooding and as much as 40 inches of rain. (Jeanty Junior Augustin)

So far, PADF has visited 12 towns in southwest Haiti to assess damage. Five of those towns have received deliveries of emergency supplies including clean water and food kits. Stay tuned for
further updates from our #HelpHaitiNow campaign. 

PADF to Provide Aid to Families Affected by Hurricane Matthew

*Update October 11, 2016 — To date, PADF has delivered emergency food kits and water purification tablets to 5,000 people in Cavaillon, Saint Louis and Maniche. Deliveries are en route for Saint Jean du Sud and Chantal. 

Washington, DC (October 5, 2016) — The Pan American Development Foundation is distributing emergency relief supplies to at least 50,000 people affected by Hurricane Matthew in the Caribbean, particularly in Southern Haiti.

PADF and partners including Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. will provide urgently needed supplies to families affected by the storm including:

  • SAFE DRINKING WATER (CHLORINE OR PURIFICATION TABLETS)
  • ADEQUATE LATRINES
  • HAND-WASHING STATIONS
  • HYGIENE KITS
  • WATER PURIFICATION TABLETS 
  • COLLAPSIBLE WATER STORAGE CONTAINERS
  • HEALTH AND SANITATION AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS TO PREVENT DISEASE
  • EMERGENCY SHELTER TOOLKITS

“This hurricane is extremely powerful and has caused widespread damage,” says Nadia Cherrouk, Country Director of PADF Haiti. “Our staff is working to deliver urgently-needed supplies to people in isolated, coastal areas. Time is of the essence.”

As many as 1.4 million Haitians need
humanitarian assistance after the devastating Category 4 storm, according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). PADF will focus immediate relief efforts in the communities of Aquin, Saint Louis du Sud, Cavaillon, Cayes, Torbeck, Camp-Perrin, Maniche and Jérémie. 

Some areas in southern Haiti and southwestern Dominican Republic received up to 40 inches of rain in less than 48 hours. Storm surges and hurricane-force winds caused extensive property damage, flash floods and thousands are living without clean water. Most of the region's crops have been destroyed.

Thousands of people need emergency relief supplies and access to clean water and sanitation in order to prevent the outbreak of bacterial diseases like cholera and water-borne illnesses. Logistics support, including transportation and the clearing of roadways, will also be an urgent priority. PADF is conducting a needs assessment to inform both the emergency response for immediate priority needs and plans for medium- to long-term recovery.

The provision of relief supplies to Haiti is part of a first response phase. The Foundation plans to collaborate with its local partners and an extensive regional network that includes grassroots and community-based organizations in the affected areas.

“We’re looking to meet the most pressing needs of those affected by the hurricane,” says Liza Mantilla, Director of Disaster Management. We will collaborate with our partners to plan a comprehensive response and recovery. Haiti will need our support long after the rain has stopped.”

PADF has been working in Haiti for more than 35 years. As the humanitarian arm of the Organization of American States (OAS), PADF responds to the region's major natural disasters and humanitarian crises throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.

Learn more at www.padf.org/Help-Haiti-Now

Caribbean Braces for Hurricane Matthew

NASA/NOAA GOES Project

601,241
IN SHELTERS
(HAITI, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, JAMAICA CUBA)

300,000 
IN HAITI
NEED IMMEDIATE ASSISTANCE

 

 

Hurricane Matthew made landfall in Haiti Tuesday morning.

  •  High waves combined with excessive rainfall, hurricane-force winds and storm surges could cause extensive damage, primarily in coastal areas.
  • United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) teams have arrived in Jamaica and Haiti and are supporting national efforts.
  •  The National Emergency Operations Centres (COE) in Bahamas, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti and Jamaica remain on alert
  • 340,000 people in 1,300 emergency shelters in Haiti
  • 251,795 people in some 218 shelters in Cuba, most of them with families or friends
  • 900 people in shelters in Jamaica
  • 73,000 people affected in Colombia

PADF's Disaster Management team is closely monitoring the situation and is reaching out to potential local NGO partners to collaborate in an emergency if international assistance is requested after the passing of the hurricane.